Flow Rate

“It has more than paid for itself in supplies for bi-monthly water changes and in the time it saves me, because I have always done all the work on that aquarium myself” – Rick

Flow Rate Charts and Calculating the Flow Rate

To determine the best flow rate for the Aquaripure in your aquarium please use this chart.

  Lightly StockedModerately StockedHeavily Stocked
Mini5-15 gal0.5 dps*0.5 dps1 dps
Small15-35 gal1 dps1 dps2 dps
35-55 gal1 dps1-2 dps2 dps
Medium 55-90 gal2 dps2-3 dps3-4 dps
90-130 gal2-3 dps3-4 dps4 dps
Large120-200 gal3-4 dps4-5 dps5-6 dps
200+ gal4-5 dps6-7 dps8 dps

*Dps refers to Drops per Second.

If you still want to keep a lot of extra biofiltration or a UV sterilizer then reduce the drip rate that is indicated. Excess biofiltration or the use of a UV sterilizer will both reduce the efficiency of the Aquaripure and the flow rate will need to be slowed down to accommodate this. If both excess biofiltration and a UV sterilizer are used then the Aquaripure might not cycle or work properly until some of the excess filtration is eliminated. Some extra biological filtration should be used in well stocked systems but overall it should still be reduced to a fairly minimal amount and only what is needed to prevent ammonia and nitrite in the tank. Skimmers, refugiums, canister filters, and most other filtration is fine and can be used with the Aquaripure.

You can measure 2 drops per second by taking the included 15 ml cup and filling it to the 10 ml mark in about 50 seconds. You can measure 3 drops per second by taking the included 15 ml cup and filling it to the 10 ml mark in about 33 seconds. To measure 4 drops take the included cup and fill it to the 10 ml mark in about 25 seconds.

At the slower flow rates it can be easier just to time the flow rate against the second hand of a clock or a stopwatch. Once you adjust it a few times most users find they can adjust it pretty quickly by sight

You can measure 4 drops per second by taking the included 15 ml cup and filling it to the 10 ml mark in about 25 seconds. You can measure 6 drops per second by taking the included 15 ml cup and filling it to the 10 ml mark in about 17 seconds. To measure 8 drops take the included cup and fill it to the 10 ml mark in about 13 seconds.

The calculations required to fill up a given volume in seconds for a given drip rate are as follows:

Volume to be filled in milliliters multiplied by 10 and then divided by Drops per Second

Or (Volume to be filled in ml x 10) / dps

Example: You want to fill up a 5 ml vial and the recommended flow rate is 2 dps. To determine the number of seconds it will take to fill 5 ml at 2 dps you will multiply 5 and 10 and then divide that number by 2. So 5 x 10 = 50 and 50 / 2 = 25. So two drops per second will fill up 5 ml in 25 seconds.

This flow rate chart is intended to be a general guideline. The optimal flow rate will depend on several variables such as bioload and other filtration. The majority of users just quickly fall into a routine with their filters and find the optimal rate right away. If you feel like you need assistance, just contact us. If you want more individual answers advice please provide all the details of your aquarium, fish, and other filtration.